100 of the Best German Adjectives for Any Place & Time - GermanPod101.com Blog (2023)

Ever felt a little lost for words when speaking German?

Chances are, you were missing an adjective. You can’t get very far when describing something if you’re limited to only a handful of adjectives, at most.

“He’s a tall, muscular, bald guy…okay, I can say he’s tall…how about ‘bald?’”

That sentence can’t even get off the ground.

But here, with the information in this article, you’ll be able to learn German adjectives and confidently describe pretty much anything you need to, without breaking a sweat. Because 100 German adjectives is a lot!

In our German adjectives lesson, before our list, you’ll find the following information on how to use German adjectives:

  • German adjectives rules
  • German adjectives word order
  • German adjective endings and how to conjugate them
  • Tips on how to learn German adjectives

Let’s have a look.

100 of the Best German Adjectives for Any Place & Time - GermanPod101.com Blog (2)

Table of Contents

  1. A Quick Overview of German Adjectives
  2. Top 100 German Adjectives List
  3. Add a Few Words and Make Your Meaning More Exact
  4. How to Go Beyond German Adjectives Vocab to Total Mastery

1. A Quick Overview of German Adjectives

It’s entirely possible that German adjectives are some of the most complex things in the German language. There’s no getting around the fact that there’s a lot to master.

So how do German adjectives work?

Very briefly, when used in front of a noun, adjectives in German decline, that is, their endings change in order to give extra information about the grammatical function of that noun.

  • Ich sehe einen alten Mann.
    I see an old man.

Here, the adjective alt, meaning “old,” takes the ending -en to show that the noun, Mann, is the direct object of the sentence. English doesn’t make this kind of distinction, so it’s a little tricky to get your mind thinking in that way at first.

Fortunately, such changes don’t happen at all when the adjective comes after the noun.

  • Meine Mutter ist alt.
    My mother is old.

Same word, no ending. No problem!

In this article, we’ll list out the most important German adjectives you need to know, giving you the root form at first and then declined forms in the sentence. If you haven’t already, check out our information on German cases, and then you can exercise your grammar knowledge by figuring out what case the adjective is in!

One other note before our German adjectives list: German doesn’t distinguish between adjectives and adverbs. So it’s possible to use quite a few of these as adverbs instead; in fact, that’s what we did in a few examples, where the adverb meaning is more easily understandable to you.

2. Top 100 German Adjectives List

1- German Colors Adjectives: Describing Colors

Colors help us distinguish objects from one another, and color words help us communicate with others exactly which one we’re talking about.

1. weiß – white

Ich habe ein weißes Kissen.
I have a white pillow.

2. schwarz – black

Ist dein Auto schwarz?
Is your car black?

3. blau – blue

Sie trägt blaue Jeans.
She’s wearing blue jeans.

4. rot – red

Wo sind meine roten Socken?
Where are my red socks?

5. gelb – yellow

Hast du meine gelben Stiefel gesehen?
Have you seen my yellow boots?

6. grün – green

Er hat mir eine grüne Krawatte gegeben.
He gave me a green tie.

7. braun – brown

Magst du braune Schuhe?
Do you like brown shoes?

8. rosa – pink

Ihre Haare sind rosa.
Her hair is pink.

(Video) 100 Phrases Every German Beginner Must-Know

9. orange – orange (Note that in German, this word is pronounced in the French way, with a nasal A and a ZH sound)

Was für ein schönes oranges Kleid!
What a beautiful orange dress!

10. grau – gray

Der Himmel ist heute grau.
The sky is gray today.

2- German Adjectives for Food: Describing Taste

You’re not limited to just German food when you speak German. Use these words to order what you’d like or insult what you don’t—the choice is yours!

11. scharf – spicy

Indisches Essen ist oft scharf.
Indian food is often spicy.

12. würzig – spicy, with a lot of spices

Das ist zu würzig für mich.
That’s too spicy for me.

13. süß – sweet

Schoko-Eis ist süß.
Chocolate ice cream is sweet.

14. lecker – tasty

Das ist richtig lecker!
That’s really tasty!

15. frisch – fresh

Gibt es hier frische Milch?
Is there fresh milk here?

16. gebraten – fried

Gebratene Eier sind gesund.
Fried eggs are healthy.

17. stinkend – stinky

Magst du stinkenden Tofu?
Do you like stinky tofu?

18. salzig – salty

Das Abendessen war ein bisschen zu salzig.
Dinner was a little too salty.

19. bitter – bitter

Warum ist die Suppe bitter?
Why is the soup bitter?

20. sauer – sour

Die Milch ist schon sauer.
The milk is sour already.

21. roh – raw

Bitte geben Sie mir nichts rohes.
Please don’t give me anything raw.

3- German Adjectives for Personality

People you meet on the street come in all kinds. Everybody has a unique personality, and it’s high time that you started talking about them in German.

22. offen – open-hearted; personable

Er ist definitiv ein offener Mensch.
He’s definitely an open person.

23. tolerant – tolerant (the stress in German is on the last syllable)

Sind die Leute hier tolerant?
Are the people tolerant here?

24. hilfsbereit – helpful; ready to help

Ja, sie sind immer hilfsbereit.
Yes, they’re always ready to help.

25. geduldig – patient

Mein Vater ist nicht geduldig.
My father is not patient.

26. klug – clever

Die Studenten sind sehr klug.
The students are very clever.

27. böse – evil

Die böse Hexe lebt im Wald.
The evil witch lives in the forest.

28. egoistisch – selfish; egoistic

Sei nicht so egoistisch.
Don’t be so selfish.

29. faul – lazy

Warum musst du immer faul sein?
Why do you have to be so lazy all the time?

30. brav – well-behaved (used for children)

Braves Kind!
Wonderful child!

31. gefährlich – dangerous

Es ist zu gefährlich!
It’s too dangerous!

4- German Adjectives: Feelings & Emotions

A lot of Germans think that just saying “I’m fine” when they ask how you’re doing is a little bit superficial, or even rude. Here’s how you can learn to be more specific and more honest.

32. genervt – annoyed

Warum bist du genervt?
Why are you annoyed?

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33. froh – happy

Ich bin immer froh zuhause.
I’m always happy at home.

34. müde – tired

Meine Mutter ist abends immer müde.
My mom is always tired in the evenings.

35. hungrig – hungry

Ich bin hungrig, aber ich will hier nichts essen.
I’m hungry, but I don’t want to eat anything here.

36. traurig – sad

Was für ein trauriger Film!
What a sad movie!

37. gespannt – excited

Seid ihr alle gespannt?
Are you all excited?

38. übel – nauseated; queasy

Mir ist auf einmal übel.
I’m queasy all of a sudden.

39. bequem – comfortable

Dieser Rock ist nicht bequem.
This skirt is not comfortable.

40. wütend – angry; furious

Bitte sei nicht so wütend auf ihn.
Please don’t be so angry with him.

5- German Adjectives for Describing Nationality

Take care in this section. In German, adjectives describing countries are never capitalized, as they are in English. This is one of the biggest giveaways that you might be a non-native German writer!

41. deutsch – German

Deutsches Essen ist nicht sehr bekannt.
German food is not very well-known.

42. französisch – French

Ist er französisch oder kanadisch?
Is he French or Canadian?

43. dänisch – Danish

Die dänische Küste ist kalt.
The Danish coast is cold.

44. ungarisch – Hungarian

Willst du einen ungarischen Film sehen?
Do you want to watch a Hungarian film?

45. chinesisch – Chinese

Chinesische Bücher sind sehr lang.
Chinese books are very long.

46. südafrikanisch – South African

Er spielt für die südafrikanische Mannschaft.
He plays for the South African team.

47. mexikanisch – Mexican

Es gibt nicht so viele mexikanische Restaurants in Europa.
There aren’t many Mexican restaurants in Europe.

48. kanadisch – Canadian

Haben Sie kanadischen Speck?
Do you have Canadian bacon?

6- German Adjectives for Describing Time

Some days pass pretty fast, and others pass pretty slow. These words can be used as adverbs and adjectives without any difference.

49. schnell – fast

Die Züge in Japan sind schnell.
The trains in Japan are fast.

50. langsam – slow

Die Nachrichten sind heute langsam.
The news is slow today.

51. früh – early

Ich muss heute früh schlafen.
I need to sleep early tonight.

52. spät – late

Seien Sie Morgen nicht spät.
Don’t be late tomorrow.

53. pünktlich – punctual; on time

Sie ist immer pünktlich.
She’s always on time.

7- German Adjectives for Describing Appearance (People)

Never be rude when describing others—just be discreet. Hopefully, you can use these words to more accurately describe yourself as well!

54. glatzköpfig – bald

Der Mann war glatzköpfig.
The man was bald.

55. dick – fat

Sie sind ein bisschen dick geworden.
They got a little fatter.

56. dünn – thin

Wieso ist er so dünn?
How is he so thin?

57. reich – rich

Ich möchte nächstes Jahr reich sein.
I want to be rich next year.

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58. arm – poor

Warum gibt es immer noch arme Leute?
Why are there still poor people?

59. groß – tall

Sie ist ziemlich groß für ein Mädchen.
She’s pretty tall for a girl.

60. alt – old

Wie alt bist du?
How old are you?

61. jung – young

Der junger Mann hat mir geholfen.
The young man helped me.

62. schön – beautiful

Du bist sehr schön heute!
You’re very beautiful today!

8- German Adjectives for Describing Appearance (Things)

Going shopping in Berlin, comparing your stuff with your friend’s, or just trying to find that one thing you misplaced? These are the essential German adjectives you can’t live without.

63. teuer – expensive

Warum sind sie so teuer?
Why are they so expensive?

64. billig – cheap

Trägst du billige Kleidung?
Do you wear cheap clothes?

65. breit – wide; broad

Die Straße ist nicht breit.
The road is not wide.

66. lang – long

Der Brief ist lang and traurig.
The letter is long and sad.

67. schwer – heavy

Das ist zu schwer, und ich kann es nicht ziehen.
That’s too heavy, and I can’t pull it.

68. leicht – light

Haben Sie einen leichten Karton?
Do you have a light cardboard box?

69. dick – thick

Das Buch ist dick und schwer.
The book is thick and heavy.

70. eng – narrow

Es gibt wahrscheinlich Spinnen in diesem engen Flur.
There are probably spiders in this narrow corridor.

71. hier – here

Bist du schon hier?
Are you here yet?

72. da – there

Siehst du das Gebäude da?
Do you see that building there?

73. dort – there (far away)

Sie wohnt in den Bergen dort.
She lives in yonder mountains.

74. hell – bright

Das Zimmer ist hell und bequem.
The room is bright and comfortable.

75. dunkel – dark

Warum ist es so dunkel hier?
Why is it so dark here?

9- German Weather Adjectives: Describing Weather

Here are some of the most useful adjectives for talking about weather—always a good icebreaker. We actually have a whole separate resource on weather words, so pop over and check that one out too!

76. windig – windy

Heute ist ein windiger Tag.
Today is a windy day.

77. heiß – hot

Das Wetter heute ist heiß.
The weather today is hot.

78. kalt – cold

Es kann sehr kalt sein in Kanada.
It can be very cold in Canada.

79. sonnig – sunny

Gestern war es schön und sonnig.
Yesterday, it was beautiful and sunny.

80. bewölkt – cloudy

Der Himmel ist immer noch bewölkt.
The sky is still cloudy.

81. neblig – foggy

Es ist immer neblig auf dem Gipfel.
It’s always foggy on the mountain.

82. warm – warm

Heute ist nicht so warm als gestern.
Today is not as warm as yesterday.

(Video) 400 Phrases Every German Beginner Must Know

10- German Adjectives for Describing Touch

Touch is slightly different than appearance. As we all know, appearances can be deceiving!

83. hart – solid; fixed

Das Glas ist sehr hart.
The glass is very hard.

84. weich – soft; smooth

Das Bett ist weich.
The bed is soft.

85. rutschig – slippery

Pass auf, der Boden ist rutschig.
Be careful, the floor is slippery.

86. brüchig – brittle; fragile

Es ist 2019 und Handys sind immer noch brüchig.
It’s 2019 and phones are still fragile.

87. gefroren – frozen

Ich bin fast gefroren hier draußen.
I’m almost frozen out here.

88. geschmolzen – melted

Ich mag kein geschmolzenes Eis.
I don’t like melted ice cream.

11- German Adjectives for Describing Concepts

Ever tried to explain something to somebody else and they just balk at your attempt? It’s much easier if you can reassure them that it’s easy, or better yet, that it’s related to something they’re already familiar with.

89. wichtig – important

Vergiss nicht, das hier ist sehr wichtig.
Don’t forget, this is very important.

90. populär – popular

Die Zeitschrift ist nicht so populär.
The magazine is not very popular.

91. leicht – easy

Das ist leicht zu verstehen.
This is easy to understand.

92. schwer – difficult

Es ist schwer für mich, Deutsch zu sprechen.
It’s difficult for me to speak German.

93. kompliziert – complicated

Ist Esperanto eine komplizierte Sprache?
Is Esperanto a complicated language?

94. richtig – correct

Was du sagst ist richtig.
What you say is correct.

95. falsch – false

Das war eine falsche Antwort.
That was a wrong (false) answer.

96. praktisch – practical; convenient

Kinokarten übers Handy kaufen zu können ist praktisch.
Buying tickets for the movies using the phone is convenient.

97. identisch – identical

Du hast zwei identische Alternativen.
You have two identical options.

98. unterschiedlich – different

Sind sie überhaupt unterschiedlich?
Are they different at all?

99. genau – exact

Das ist genau was ich sagen wollte.
That’s exactly what I wanted to say.

100. ungefähr – about; roughly

Es gibt ungefähr zweihundert Tiere im Zoo.
There are about two hundred animals in the zoo.

3. Add a Few Words and Make Your Meaning More Exact

As you’ve probably noticed, we didn’t just stick with the bare adjectives. In German, just like English, you can add intensifiers to your adjective to alter the meaning.

One of the most common intensifiers is sehr, or “very.” Wirklich, ganz, and echt fill the same role, though echt is rather informal. All of these simply make any given adjective stronger.

On the other end of the spectrum, you’ll commonly see nicht, meaning “not.” Slap a nicht in front of any adjective, and you’ve got a perfect remedy when you can only remember the opposite. Don’t know how to say “rich?” “Not poor” does the trick in a pinch! See why learning German adjectives and their opposites is a great idea?

4. How to Go Beyond German Adjectives Vocab to Total Mastery

How many different German adjectives can you still recall? Are these important German adjectives already fading from your memory? Go back and have another look, and then maybe again tomorrow. Even better—read the sentences aloud. You’ll find that a lot of these adjectives stick without any effort.

Understanding German adjectives does take time and effort, but rest assured that it will pay off in the long run!

And if you’d like to learn even more, have a look at the other German material we have on this very website: videos, flashcards, and of course our flagship podcast.

Before you go, let us know in the comments which of these German adjectives are your favorite. Are there any adjectives in German you still want to know? We look forward to hearing from you!

100 of the Best German Adjectives for Any Place & Time - GermanPod101.com Blog (11)

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FAQs

What are positive adjectives in German? ›

gut, nett, zauberhaft, unternehmungslustig, temperamentvoll, zärtlich, einfühlsam, abenteuerlustig, majestätisch, umwerfend, fleißig, usw. Es gibt hunderte davon.

Where are adjectives placed in German? ›

As in English, German adjectives come BEFORE the noun they describe, but AFTER the verb in the sentence, unless the noun is the subject of the sentence. The only time the adjective does not agree with the word it describes is when it comes AFTER the verb.

What is the opposite of gut in German? ›

German adjectives and opposites to learn
GERMANENGLISHOPPOSITE
gutgoodschlecht, böse
halbhalfganz
harthardweich
häufigfrequent, commonselten
96 more rows
7 Nov 2022

What are the two types of Germanic adjectives? ›

Comparative and Superlative German Adjectives. Examples of comparative adjectives and superlative adjectives in German would be: Comparative: Er ist größer als ich (He is taller than me). Superlative: Er ist der größte (He is the tallest).

What are the 100 most common words in German? ›

100 most frequently used German words
  • der / die / das (def. art.) the; (dem. pron.) ...
  • und (conj.) and.
  • sein (verb) to be; (aux./perfect tense)
  • in (prep.) in [variation: im in the]
  • ein (indef. art.) a, an; (pron.) one (of)
  • zu (prep.) to, at; (adv.) too.
  • haben (verb) to have; (aux./perfect tense)
  • ich (pers. pron.) I.

What are the most powerful adjectives? ›

20 Powerful Adjectives in English
  • very noisy = deafening.
  • very painful = excruciating.
  • very poor = destitute.
  • very damaging/upsetting = devastating.
  • very beautiful = gorgeous.
  • very busy = swamped.
  • very crowded = packed.
  • very happy/excited = thrilled.

What are the 9 prepositions in German? ›

The 9 German prepositions that always require that the noun in the phrase be in the dative case are aus, außer, bei, mit, nach, seit, von, zu, gegenüber. Prepositions do NOT have tidy 1-to-1 English-German translations and must be learned within authentic spoken/written German context.

What are the 9 German pronouns? ›

German has subject pronouns, too: ich, du, er, sie, es, wir, ihr, sie, Sie.

What do Germans call the first floor? ›

Etage" which is normally the first floor.

What do German call their lover? ›

Liebling (darling)

"Liebling" is about as close as German comes to the English "darling." While the expression contains the word for love - "Liebe" - it's also borrowed for other purposes. Liebling can be used as a prefix meaning "favorite." Your "Lieblingsbuch," for example, is your favorite book.

What is the most complex German word? ›

1. Kraftfahrzeug-Haftpflichtversicherung (36) Officially recognised by the Duden - Germany's pre-eminent dictionary - as the longest word in German, Kraftfahrzeug-Haftpflichtversicherung is a 36-letter, tongue-tying way of describing a rather, mundane everyday concept: motor vehicle liability insurance.

What are some cool German words? ›

10 weird German words
  • Ohrwurm (ear worm) ...
  • Weichei (soft egg) ...
  • Backpfeifengesicht (slap face) ...
  • Erklärungsnot (explanation poverty) ...
  • Purzelbaum (tumble tree) ...
  • Zungenbrecher (tongue breaker) ...
  • Schattenparker (shadow parker) ...
  • Kuddelmuddel (muddled mess)

Do German adjectives change for gender? ›

This alignment, which is a type of inflection (like verbs undergo), is called declension. While an adjective in English stays the same no matter the plurality or role of the noun, German adjectives need to be adjusted with different endings to indicate the gender, plurality, and case of the noun.

WHAT ARE 4 Germanic languages? ›

Scholars often divide the Germanic languages into three groups: West Germanic, including English, German, and Netherlandic (Dutch); North Germanic, including Danish, Swedish, Icelandic, Norwegian, and Faroese; and East Germanic, now extinct, comprising only Gothic and the languages of the Vandals, Burgundians, and a ...

What are the most common German words? ›

Basic German Words
  • Guten Tag = Good day.
  • Hallo = Hello.
  • Auf Wiedersehen = Goodbye.
  • Bitte = Please.
  • Danke = Thanks, Thank you.
  • Entschuldigung = Sorry.
  • Gesundheit = Bless you (after someone sneezes)
  • Ja = Yes.

How many words in German do you need to know to be fluent? ›

How many words do you need to be fluent in German? To be fluent in German, a speaker needs to know around 10,000 words.

What is the coolest German word? ›

10 beautiful and memorable German words
  1. Sehnsucht. Amid different definitions, which vary from yearning, desire and/or craving, Sehnsucht is a feeling of longing for something unknown and indefinite. ...
  2. Weltschmerz. ...
  3. Torschlusspanik. ...
  4. Fernweh. ...
  5. Zweisamkeit. ...
  6. Backpfeifengesicht. ...
  7. Feierabend. ...
  8. Reisefieber.
9 Feb 2021

What are the 50 examples of adjective? ›

Top 50 adjectives in English
1. AbleHaving what is required (e.g., money or skills) to do something When I was young, I was able to stand on my head.
2. AngryBeing very annoyed or upset If I'm late for class again, the teacher is going to be angry.
58 more rows
10 Nov 2022

What are some fancy adjectives? ›

adjective
  • detailed.
  • intricate.
  • elegant.
  • complicated.
  • elaborate.
  • sophisticated.
  • complex.
  • involved.

What are some badass adjectives? ›

badass
  • agitator.
  • rebel.
  • demagogue.
  • dissident.
  • fighter.
  • frondeur.
  • renegade.
  • sparkplug.

What are the 49 prepositions? ›

Preposition List: 49 Examples
PrepositionExample Sentence
BeneathSome people believe the lost city of Atlantis is still buried beneath the sea.
BesideThe bride made her way down the aisle to stand beside her groom.
BetweenBetween my homework and my new job, I don't think I'll be getting much sleep this week.
46 more rows
30 Sept 2019

What are the 48 prepositions? ›

List of 48 Commonly Used Prepositions
aboutbehindfrom
acrossbeneathinto
afterbesidelike
againstbetweennear
alongbeyondnext to
7 more rows

What is a Präposition in German? ›

German prepositions include words like bis, mit, über and durch. They're words that go before a noun (or pronoun) to provide extra information — usually something about the noun's position in time or space. Examples of English prepositions include “until”, “with” and “before”.

Does German Have 3 genders? ›

There are 3 noun genders in German: masculine, feminine, and neuter.

What is the most common gender in German? ›

According to Duden, approximately 46% of German nouns are feminine, 34% are masculine and 20% are neuter. So, statistically speaking, if you have to guess, don't guess neuter. The majority of feminine nouns can be identified as feminine because they designate female beings or because they end in a particular suffix.

What is the V2 rule in German? ›

The V2 rule: The finite verb (i.e. the verb that is conjugated to match the subject) belongs in the second position. As in English, the most common word order in German is Subject - Verb - Direct Object (as in "Der Mann isst den Apfel," "The man eats the apple").

What did Germany call their soldiers? ›

The Wehrmacht (German pronunciation: [ˈveːɐ̯maxt] ( listen), lit. 'defence force') was the unified armed forces of Nazi Germany from 1935 to 1945. It consisted of the Heer (army), the Kriegsmarine (navy) and the Luftwaffe (air force).

What do Germans call their homes? ›

The German word for 'house' is das Haus. But German speakers have made the prepositional phrase zu Hause, meaning 'at home', into a noun to describe the place where you live and feel comfortable and cosy. So if you wanted to talk about your home, as opposed to your house or flat, you would say mein Zuhause.

What is OG German? ›

o. g. ( indeclinable) Abbreviation of oben genannt (“aforementioned, named above”).

What do Germans call their husband? ›

Schatz, meaning “treasure”, is one of the most common terms of endearment you'll hear in Germany, used equally among young lovers and couples who have been married for years, as well as for children. You can also mix it up by making it into a diminutive like “Schatzi” or “Schätzchen”.

What do Germans call their babies? ›

Terms of Endearment for Children
Schnucki(kind of like) sweetie
Schneckesnail
Bienebee
Mausebärmouse bear
14 Apr 2021

Are there any pretty German words? ›

Here are some of our, admittedly subjective, favorite pretty German words.
...
Beautiful German words.
GermanIPAEnglish
Libelle[liˈbɛlə]dragonfly
Schmetterling[ˈʃmɛtɐlɪŋ]butterfly
Qualle[ˈkvalə]jellyfish
Papagei[ˌpapaˈɡaɪ̯parrot
39 more rows
8 Jun 2022

What is the longest German word? ›

The longest word in the standard German dictionary is Kraftfahrzeug-Haftpflichtversicherung – which is the word for motor vehicle liability insurance. But at 36 letters, it's rather puny. Rechtsschutzversicherungsgesellschaften, a touch longer at 39 letters, is the language's longest non-dictionary word.

What is German word for girl? ›

Mädchen

What is the German word for beautiful girl? ›

beautiful girl: Schnuckelchen; schönes Mädchen.

Why is girl not feminine in German? ›

As for girls, the word Mädchen is still neuter for two reasons, a) because it ends in 'chen', b) because nouns ending in 'chen' don't change in the plural. By saying das Mädchen, we know it's one girl, whereas die Mädchen is more than one.

What gender is woman in German? ›

Definite articles in German
GenderGerman articleEnglish
maleder Mannthe man
femaledie Frauthe woman
neutraldas Kindthe child
pluraldie Autosthe cars
10 Dec 2018

Do colors have gender in German? ›

When used as a noun, German colors always take the neuter gender, i.e. they use “das”.

What language is closest to German? ›

German is most similar to other languages within the West Germanic language branch, including Afrikaans, Dutch, English, the Frisian languages, Low German, Luxembourgish, Scots, and Yiddish.

Is English more Germanic or Latin? ›

German is widely considered among the easier languages for native English speakers to pick up. That's because these languages are true linguistic siblings—originating from the exact same mother tongue. In fact, eighty of the hundred most used words in English are of Germanic origin.

Which Germanic language is closest to English? ›

The closest language to English is one called Frisian, which is a Germanic language spoken by a small population of about 480,000 people. There are three separate dialects of the language, and it's only spoken at the southern fringes of the North Sea in the Netherlands and Germany.

What are the 4 extra letters in German? ›

While many say that the German alphabet has 26 letters just like English, there are also four additional letters in the German language: ä, ö, ü and ß. If you count these, this brings the count up to 30 letters.

How many words does the average person know German? ›

And the average speaker uses only 12,000 to 16,000 words in their vocabulary.

How many German words should you know about 85% of a German text? ›

Long story short, research says that to understand 85% of German texts you need to know about 1,300 words.

What are positive adjectives examples? ›

Positive adjectives describe people, places, and things in a positive way. Using these noun modifiers, you can express emotions such as satisfaction, love, amusement, hope, and more. Here are a few examples of sentences that use good emotional words: Steve is happy today.

What are positive adjectives? ›

Positive adjective words are the adjectives that are in their base form. They do not reflect any comparison, be it higher or lower.

How do you compliment in German? ›

Top 10 German Compliments
  1. 'Du siehst heute toll aus' is a unisex statement that means you look fantastic today. ...
  2. 'Du bist sehr schön' means you're beautiful. ...
  3. 'Du siehst umwerfend aus! ...
  4. 'Gelb steht dir' means 'yellow just suits you well. ...
  5. 'Deine Frisur gefällt mir' means 'I just love your hairstyle.
25 Jan 2022

What are adjectives 100 examples? ›

100 Adjectives, Comparatives and Superlatives List
AdjectiveComparativeSuperlative
angryangrierangriest
badworseworst
bigbiggerbiggest
bitterbittererbitterest
10 more rows

What are adjectives give 30 examples? ›

Examples of adjectives
  • They live in a beautiful house.
  • Lisa is wearing a sleeveless shirt today. This soup is not edible.
  • She wore a beautiful dress.
  • He writes meaningless letters.
  • This shop is much nicer.
  • She wore a beautiful dress.
  • Ben is an adorable baby.
  • Linda's hair is gorgeous.

What are 3 adjectives that you think best describe you? ›

Example answers for "Describe yourself in 3 words"
  • "I'd describe myself as driven, communicative and reliable. ...
  • "I'm organized, patient and helpful. ...
  • "First, I'm passionate. ...
  • "The first word I'd use to describe myself is approachable. ...
  • "Enthusiastic, confident and friendly are three words I'd pick to describe myself.
3 Jan 2022

What is an excellent adjective? ›

accomplished, admirable, attractive, distinguished, exceptional, exemplary, exquisite, fine, first-rate, good, great, magnificent, outstanding, skillful, sterling, superb, superlative, capital, certified, champion.

What are 5 adjectives to describe a person? ›

Some of the adjectives that we can use are – affable, amicable, caring, thoughtful, beautiful, classy, precious, impressive, irreplaceable, trustworthy, understanding, sweet, etc. These are just a few examples.

How do you describe a smart woman? ›

Words About Intelligence

Astute – She has clever solutions to problems based on her sharp perception. Clear-sighted – She is perceptive and able to see decisions clearly. Creative – She comes up with ideas that others have not considered before.

How do you describe a lovely person? ›

Some common synonyms of lovely are beautiful, comely, fair, handsome, and pretty. While all these words mean "exciting sensuous or aesthetic pleasure," lovely is close to beautiful but applies to a narrower range of emotional excitation in suggesting the graceful, delicate, or exquisite.

What are 3 positive qualities? ›

Examples of personal positive qualities: kind, gentle, strong, resilient, caring, assertive, hard-working, reliable, honest, practical, responsible, loyal, mature, creative, consistent, appreciative, capable, quick, sensitive, perceptive, patient, thoughtful, fit, trustworthy, shows initiative, motivated, versatile, ...

What do you call a beautiful German girl? ›

You can use schön “beautiful” and hinreißend “gorgeous” for women.

What is the most German thing to say? ›

10 German expressions everyone should know
  • “Das ist mir Wurst” The literal translation is: “This is sausage to me” ...
  • “Nur Bahnhof verstehen” ...
  • “Jemandem die Daumen drücken” ...
  • “Ich glaub mein Schwein pfeift” ...
  • “Ich glaub' ich spinne” ...
  • “Fix und fertig sein” ...
  • “Na?” ...
  • “Bock haben”
26 Oct 2022

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